Capitol rioter Stager transferred to Arkansas prison

A Conway truck driver who pleaded guilty to assaulting a police officer with a dangerous weapon during the U.S. Capitol riot has been moved from a federal prison in Philadelphia to one in Forrest City.

According to the federal Bureau of Prisons website, Peter Francis Stager, 44, was at a federal transfer center in Oklahoma City on Wednesday. On Thursday, the website listed him as being incarcerated at the low-security federal prison in Forrest City.

Stager, 44, used a flagpole, with an American flag attached, to beat a police officer who was face down on the Capitol steps.

After notifying the sheriff’s office, Stager was arrested by FBI agents in Conway on Jan. 14, 2021, and remained in the D.C. jail until being transferred after his July 24 sentencing to FDC Philadelphia, which is an administrative security federal detention center.

The Bureau of Prisons website first listed Stager as being in Bureau of Prisons custody on Aug. 15. He was in the Philadelphia prison at that time, according to the website.

During his sentencing hearing in Washington, Amy Collins, Stager’s attorney, said he requested to be sent to the low-security federal prison in Texarkana, Texas, and U.S. District Judge Rudolph Contreras said he’d make that recommendation.

Contreras sentenced Stager to 52 months in prison and gave him credit for the 31 months he served in the D.C. jail.

The Bureau of Prisons website indicates his projected release date is Sept. 24, 2024, and a spokesman for the bureau confirmed that date.

The projected release date reflects the maximum of “good conduct” credit Stager can receive under the First Step Act of 2018.

“The Act amended 18 U.S.C. § 3624(b) so that federal inmates can earn up to 54 days of good time credit for every year of their imposed sentence rather than for every year of their sentence served,” according to the Bureau of Prisons website.

The “projected release date” is based on the sentence imposed, less the amount of good conduct time they may potentially earn as well as other factors, according to an email from Benjamin O’Cone, a spokesman for the Bureau of Prisons, who said he couldn’t comment on any specific inmate’s situation for privacy, safety and security reasons.

“A ‘projected’ release date is just that,” wrote O’Cone. “It can be adjusted when warranted. The projected release date is subject to change during the inmate’s period of incarceration.”

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